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Rushikesh Dudhat

Geography and Environment

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04-Oct-2020 09:09 PM

CSE Prelims, 2020 Geography & Environment Discussion (Set C) By Rushikesh Dudhat

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 on 05-Oct-2020 11:54 PM
109*

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 on 05-Oct-2020 11:53 PM
sir i am getting 119-112 marks approx.

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04-Oct-2020 09:08 PM

(Pdf) CSE Prelims, 2020 Geography & Environment paper Discussion


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26-Sep-2020 08:14 PM

World Tourism Day: COVID -19 an opportunity to rethink Himalayan tourism

Please look into article on Down to Earth on Eco-tourism.

https://www.downtoearth.org.in/blog/environment/world-tourism-day-covid-19-an-opportunity-to-rethink-himalayan-tourism-73552

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29-Jun-2020 09:51 PM

Geography Optional Crash Course

Understand the approach of Geomorphology.

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 on 16-Aug-2020 03:06 PM
Respected sir, Iam srikanth , so far i didn't attend any live QnA session owing to my time constraints. I just have been following all recorded classes and sometimes only I use to go through recorded QnA sessions selectively . Sir Iam not getting many doubts also becuaee that is the clarity I get after watching your class. Your unique way of teaching is fabulous sir , it feels just as iam sitting in real class. sir one of my humble appeal to you that announce the important events such as tests etc in the main classes itself so that I may not need to go through each and every QnA session . and, sir ,Please provide me class test papers which have been conducted till now . thanks you sir.

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29-Jun-2020 09:47 PM

Earthquakes

 QUAKE ROCKS NORTHEAST

The Regional Seismic Centre has stated that a medium intensity earthquake has rocked Mizoram, Meghalaya, Manipur and the other northeastern States.

The 5.1 magnitude quake was tracked at a depth of 35 km from the earth’s surface at a place near Aizawl in Mizoram, an official at the Regional Seismic Centre here said.

photo_2020-06-24_10-18-54.jpg

What is earthquake?

An earthquake is the shaking of the surface of the Earth, resulting from the sudden release of energy in the Earth’s lithosphere that creates seismic waves. Earthquakes can range in size from those that are so weak that they cannot be felt to those violent enough to toss people around and destroy whole cities. The seismicity or seismic activity of an area refers to the frequency, type and size of earthquakes experienced over a period of time.

At the Earth’s surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacement of the ground. When the epicenter of a large earthquake is located offshore, the seabed may be displaced sufficiently to cause a tsunami. Earthquakes can also trigger landslides, and occasionally volcanic activity.

In its most general sense, the word earthquake is used to describe any seismic event — whether natural or caused by humans — that generates seismic waves. Earthquakes are caused mostly by rupture of geological faults, but also by other events such as volcanic activity, landslides, mine blasts, and nuclear tests. An earthquake’s point of initial rupture is called its focus or hypocenter. The epicenter is the point at ground level directly above the hypocenter.

 

What causes earthquakes and where do they happen?

 

The earth has four major layers: the inner core, outer core, mantle and crust.

Earth's Interior ( Real World ) | Earth Science | CK-12 Foundation

The crust and the top of the mantle make up a thin skin on the surface of our planet. But this skin is not all in one piece – it is made up of many pieces like a puzzle covering the surface of the earth. 

Not only that, but these puzzle pieces keep slowly moving around, sliding past one another and bumping into each other. We call these puzzle pieces tectonic plates, and the edges of the plates are called the plate boundaries.

The plate boundaries are made up of many faults, and most of the earthquakes around the world occur on these faults. Since the edges of the plates are rough, they get stuck while the rest of the plate keeps moving. Finally, when the plate has moved far enough, the edges unstick on one of the faults and there is an earthquake.

 

Why does the earth shake when there is an earthquake?

While the edges of faults are stuck together, and the rest of the block is moving, the energy that would normally cause the blocks to slide past one another is being stored up. When the force of the moving blocks finally overcomes the friction of the jagged edges of the fault and it unsticks, all that stored up energy is released. The energy radiates outward from the fault in all directions in the form of seismic waves like ripples on a pond. The seismic waves shake the earth as they move through it, and when the waves reach the earth’s surface, they shake the ground and anything on it, like our houses and us! (see P&S Wave inset)

 

 

How are earthquakes recorded?

 

Earthquakes are recorded by instruments called seismographs. The recording they make is called a seismogram. The seismograph has a base that sets firmly in the ground, and a heavy weight that hangs free. When an earthquake causes the ground to shake, the base of the seismograph shakes too, but the hanging weight does not. Instead the spring or string that it is hanging from absorbs all the movement. The difference in position between the shaking part of the seismograph and the motionless part is what is recorded.

 

How do scientists measure the size of earthquakes?

 

The size of an earthquake depends on the size of the fault and the amount of slip on the fault, but that’s not something scientists can simply measure with a measuring tape since faults are many kilometers deep beneath the earth’s surface. So how do they measure an earthquake? They use the seismogram recordings made on the seismographs at the surface of the earth to determine how large the earthquake was. A short wiggly line that doesn’t wiggle very much means a small earthquake, and a long wiggly line that wiggles a lot means a large earthquake. The length of the wiggle depends on the size of the fault, and the size of the wiggle depends on the amount of slip.

 

The size of the earthquake is called its magnitude. There is one magnitude for each earthquake. Scientists also talk about the intensity of shaking from an earthquake, and this varies depending on where you are during the earthquake.

 

How can scientists tell where the earthquake happened?

 

Seismograms come in handy for locating earthquakes too, and being able to see the P wave and the S wave is important. You learned how P & S waves each shake the ground in different ways as they travel through it. P waves are also faster than S waves, and this fact is what allows us to tell where an earthquake was. To understand how this works, let’s compare P and S waves to lightning and thunder. Light travels faster than sound, so during a thunderstorm you will first see the lightning and then you will hear the thunder. If you are close to the lightning, the thunder will boom right after the lightning, but if you are far away from the lightning, you can count several seconds before you hear the thunder. The further you are from the storm, the longer it will take between the lightning and the thunder.

 

P waves are like the lightning, and S waves are like the thunder. The P waves travel faster and shake the ground where you are first. Then the S waves follow and shake the ground also. If you are close to the earthquake, the P and S wave will come one right after the other, but if you are far away, there will be more time between the two. By looking at the amount of time between the P and S wave on a seismogram recorded on a seismograph, scientists can tell how far away the earthquake was from that location. However, they can’t tell in what direction from the seismograph the earthquake was, only how far away it was. If they draw a circle on a map around the station where the radius of the circle is the determined distance to the earthquake, they know the earthquake lies somewhere on the circle. But where?

 

Scientists then use a method called triangulation to determine exactly where the earthquake was. It is called triangulation because a triangle has three sides, and it takes three seismographs to locate an earthquake. If you draw a circle on a map around three different seismographs where the radius of each is the distance from that station to the earthquake, the intersection of those three circles is the epicenter!

 

Can scientists predict earthquakes?

 

No, and it is unlikely they will ever be able to predict them. Scientists have tried many different ways of predicting earthquakes, but none have been successful. On any particular fault, scientists know there will be another earthquake sometime in the future, but they have no way of telling when it will happen
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03-Jun-2020 10:01 PM

Cyclone Nisarga

We have studied in class that Tropical Cyclone moves from East to West. Then how cyclone Nisarga is moving towards Mumbai... i.e. from west to east?

  1. Tropical Cyclones generally originate in months of September to December when winds are easterly in nature. 
  2. But Nisarga originated in the month of May-June when South West monsoon winds are stronger.
  3. This explains the exception in the direction.

How was the name for upcoming cyclone 'Nisarga' coined


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25-Apr-2020 05:55 PM

Pdf File (Decoding Indian Geography by Q&A Session with Rushikesh Dudhat)


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 on 27-Apr-2020 01:34 AM
Sir plz upload edited pdf that will be more useful to us.

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25-Apr-2020 05:53 PM

Decoding Indian Geography by Q&A Session with Rushikesh Dudhat

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24-Apr-2020 07:27 PM

Environmental Organisations (Part 2 ) for UPSC Prelims 2020

Environment and Ecology is important section of UPSC Civil Services Examination especially Prelims. Questions are increasingly asked from this section. So in this lecture series Rushikesh Sir discusses about the organizations that are important from Preliminary Examination point of view. You will also get clarity on how environmental agreements and treaties have evolved over time.

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 on 26-Apr-2020 04:00 PM
Sir, can you please upload the pdf file of this lecture(Environmental organisations part2)

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22-Apr-2020 03:58 PM

Pdf File ( Env & Eco- Important Organisations Part 1)


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22-Apr-2020 03:52 PM

Environmental Organisations for UPSC Prelims 2020

Environment and Ecology is important section of UPSC Civil Services Examination especially Prelims. Questions are increasingly asked from this section. So in this lecture series Rushikesh Sir discusses about the organizations that are important from Preliminary Examination point of view. You will also get clarity on how environmental agreements and treaties have evolved over time.

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11-Mar-2020 10:25 AM

World’s largest cave fish species found in Meghalaya (Hindustan Times)

useful link: https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/world-s-largest-cave-fish-species-found-in-meghalaya/story-CChxzubsvOy310DJ0sYXcK.html

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 on 21-Mar-2020 07:19 PM
Sir, irrelevant to this news, I have a doubt in Geographical Thoughts. I am confused whether (neo-environmentalism concept) and (neo-determinism concept of Ratzel) is same or different?

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11-Mar-2020 10:16 AM

River Landforms

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05-Feb-2020 03:17 PM

World Wetlands Day

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05-Feb-2020 03:01 PM

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24-Jan-2020 04:51 PM

What is a Coronavirus

Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses that are common among animals. In rare cases, they are what scientists call zoonotic, meaning they can be transmitted from animals to humans, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Click on the link to view the Article)

useful link: https://q13fox.com/2020/01/21/coronavirus-explained-what-you-need-to-know/

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24-Jan-2020 02:27 PM

The oceans have a chronic fever

For humans, climate change is currently most felt in the warming air temperature over land. The global average temperature has risen by nearly 1°C (about 1.7°F) since preindustrial times, and that’s contributing to phenomena like worsening droughts, desertification, and changing seasons, to name a few. (Click on the link to read the Article.)

useful link: https://qz.com/1251604/the-oceans-have-a-chronic-fever/amp/?fbclid=IwAR1ncN1n-oPna1MP4JGXPnVkpAEqEpiJWLMfV5Byc2Wjj5aqe067VNvzDsU

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24-Jan-2020 02:26 PM

Air Purifiers the good the bad and the ugly

useful link: https://medium.com/@hellowynd/air-purifiers-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-f28d4c350534

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24-Jan-2020 02:25 PM

New carbon dioxide eating bacteria could help fight global warming

These bacteria, which build the entire biomass of their body from the carbon in the air, may help to develop future technologies to reduce greenhouse gas accumulation in the atmosphere (Click on the link to read the Article)

useful link: https://www.businessinsider.in/science/research/news/new-carbon-dioxide-eating-bacteria-could-help-fight-global-warming/articleshow/72271571.cms?fbclid=IwAR0NKQbXqVhg2-QOI-6GQ-ZN2w5uwXXJjJcU3Lll5j_2Lx6YbnD5z-RENGs

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